Thanks for commenting, Ron!

This is a very interesting idea: "Perhaps it is innate to strive to understand new arresting patterns when presented as significant."

I'll definitely think about it. It may be not just that when reading a well-written text we ascribe intent to the supposed writer, but that just thinking that there's a writer with intention at the other side affects our perception.

This situation effectively creates infulences to our beliefs both bottom-up (perception affects cognition, e.g. the text is "objectively" well-written so there must be a person behind) and top-down (cognition affects perception, e.g. I assume there's a person behind so the text feels well-written).

Quite interesting indeed!

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AI and Technology | Analyst at CambrianAI | Weekly Newsletter: https://mindsoftomorrow.ck.page | Contact: alber.romgar@gmail.com

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Alberto Romero

Alberto Romero

AI and Technology | Analyst at CambrianAI | Weekly Newsletter: https://mindsoftomorrow.ck.page | Contact: alber.romgar@gmail.com

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